in General Aviation

Windhoek accident report suggests low altitude stall

Posted 24 April 2017 · Add Comment

The Cessna 425 Conquest aircraft that crashed into the runway at Windhoek International Airport and killed three pilots in February 2016 came down after the engines stalled at low-altitude, the Directorate of Aircraft Accidents Investigations has said, reports Oscar Nkala

In a report compiled after concluding its probe of the fire-ball crash that killed three pilots during a flight testing mission, the directorate ruled out mechanical defects and other system malfunctions.

The report also indicated that the pilots also ignored or misinterpreted instructions from the control tower when they started a landing approach instead of circling and making a second landing approach.

The report said the aircraft hit the ground with its nose, resulting in a fire-ball that made it difficult to establish the position of the flight controls at the time of the impact.

Further, the report said an examination of the engines and mechanical components of the aircraft had concluded that they did not cause, or contribute to the accident.

The report said although there was no evidence of the pilots performing a training manoeuvre involving the simulation of loss of power from one of the engines during a landing approach, such high risk manoeuvres were common practice and could not be ruled out.


Most flight operations prohibit simulations of stalling engines unless when done on a flight simulator or at an altitude that is high enough to allow pilots to regain control should the aircraft stall or in the event of a pilot losing control.


The investigators said they could also not rule out an 'asymmetrical thrust scenario' in which one engine produces more thrust than the other, causing the aircraft to veer one direction and flip to the
under-powered side.

Among other recommendations, the directorate said the Namibia Civil Aviation Authority should prohibit the practice of simulating the loss of aircraft engine power during a landing approach, or restrict it to tests on flight simulators or at high altitudes to allow recovery should a stall occur. 

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

O.R. Tambo International Airport named ‘Airport of the Year’

O.R Tambo International Airport, South Africa’s biggest and busiest port of entry, was named African Airport of the Year at this week’s Air Cargo Africa conference and exhibition. This was the fourth time the airport has won the award.

Ethiopian to operate all-women functioned flight to Oslo on International Women Day

Ethiopian Airlines has finalised all preparations to once again celebrate International Women’s Day by operating an All- Women Functioned Flight this time on Addis Ababa – Stockholm - Oslo route on March 08, 2019.

PC-24 takes the smooth with the rough

Africa’s testing terrain and challenging runways make the Pilatus PC-24 a perfect aircraft for the region, according to ExecuJet, which is the first company to operate and manage the aircraft in Africa. Dave Calderwood reports.

The Embraer Phenom 300 is the world’s most delivered light business jet

Embraer Executive Jets delivered 53 Phenom 300 and Phenom 300E light jets in 2018, according to a report issued by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA).

Krimson marks handling of 150th flight since operations began in 2015

Krimson Aviation, the Ethiopia-based trip planning and flight support company marked the handling of its 150th flight since inception this month.

Aviation Africa: ‘Flying Forward Together’

The chairman of IATA - International Air Transport Association - H.E. Akbar Al Baker, the CEO of Gulf carrier Qatar Airways is planning a hard-hitting message about the future for aviation in the current highly politicised environment

Connect MEIA SK1402010519
See us at
Connect MEIA BT1402010519AviAssistBT201218280219AviationAfrica_BT0607280219