in People

Ninety years since Bastié became the first woman to set an aviation world record

Posted 19 July 2019 · Add Comment

Ninety years ago, on 28 July 1929, the French aviator Maryse Bastié made history when she became the first ever female pilot to set an aviation world record.

 

The record was for the duration of her flight, which she completed in a Caudron C – 109 aircraft and lasted for close to 27 hours.

On 27 September 1929, the Aero Club of France wrote to the FAI confirming that Bastié had spent 26 hours, 47 minutes, and 30 seconds in the air, and asking the Federation to include her record on the global list.

Bastié went on to set a new record for duration in 1930, at which time fellow aviator Léna Bernstein had surpassed Bastié’s 1929 flight by staying in the air for more than 35 hours.

For this record, Bastié took off on 2 September 1930 and landed on 4 September having spent almost 38 hours in flight.

The pioneering aviator also went on to set further records, including a world record for distance that led to her becoming the first Frenchwoman to claim the Harmon Trophy – an aviation award established by the wealthy balloonist Clifford B. Harman.

About Maryse Bastié

Born in Limoges, France on 27 February 1898, Marie-Louise Bombec – as she was known at the time – had a difficult early life.

However Bastié became interested in aviation when she married her second husband, the World War 1 pilot Louis Bastié.

She obtained her pilot’s license in 1925 and went on to buy a plane – the Caudron C – 109 in which she completed her record-setting flight – in 1927.

Her husband was killed in a plane crash in 1926, but Bastié kept flying and even founded her own flying school at Orly Airport in Paris.

She also served in the French Air Force, rising to the rank of Captain and eventually being named a Commander of the Legion of Honour by the French government.

Bastié died in France on 6 July 1952 when her plane crashed during take off.

She was posthumously honoured by the French government, which put her image on a postage stamp in 1955, and is buried in the Montparnasse Cemetary in Paris.

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

Airbus Foundation and African Ninety Nines in Malawi project

The Little Engineer and The African Section Ninety Nines International Organisation of Women Pilots, together with its partner Airbus Foundation, is to roll out the Airbus Little Engineer (ALE) interactive digital programme in

Paramount launches Advanced Training and Support division

Paramount Group has announced the establishment of a new division that will provide advanced training solutions for modern day ‘concept of operations’ and battlefield management to governments experiencing rising security

ACIA transitions four aircraft to Sahel Aviation Service

ACIA Aero Leasing (ACIA) has completed the transition of four aircraft to Sahel Aviation Service in Mali.

New ANS complete at Kotoka International Airport

Ghana’s Kotoka International Airport is expected to see completion of its new Air Navigation Services Agency (ANS) office any day soon.

IATA CEO speaks at The World Tourism Organisation

IATA CEO Alexandre de Juniac said during a speech at The World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) that we will not be able to eliminate the risk of Covid-19 in any foreseeable timeline, so we must learn to manage the risk of it.

ACI conference postponed until 2022

Organisers of the ACI Conference and Exhibition in Mombasa, Kenya, have postponed the event that was due to take place in March this year, until March 2022.

AMAC SK2907290121
See us at
CONNECT BT0610090421Aviation MENA 2021Aviation Africa 2021 BTNN