in Business Aviation / Features

Malawi President's air ambulance promise

Posted 21 August 2018 · Add Comment

Malawian President, Peter Mutharika, used his new year message to promise a number of health sector projects. Among his pledges was a new air ambulance, writes Jon Lake.

Some reports have suggested that the air ambulance will belong to a new state-of-the-art military hospital that is to be built at the Malawi Defence Force (MDF) headquarters at Kamuzu Barracks in Lilongwe, close to the seat of government and the presidential residence.
Though the air ambulance was to be “funded by Malawians, flying for Malawians”, and though it was said to be intended to save the lives of ordinary people involved in road accidents and other emergencies, some believe that the new military hospital and the associated air ambulance may be intended more to serve the interests of Malawi’s elite.
The establishment of the new hospital was one of the recommendations of the commission of inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of the late President Bingu wa Mutharika (the current president’s older brother) in April 2012.
Justice Elton Singini said that referring the president to a public hospital had compromised his security and privacy, and recommended that a presidential medical facility should be established at the headquarters of the Malawi Defence Force in Lilongwe.
“Such a facility needs to be properly equipped with top-of-the-range medical equipment dedicated to the treatment of the president, as well as in case of death, as is the practice in most other countries,” he said. “Locating such a facility within the military compound will also serve to safeguard the security and privacy of the president.”
The commission may have felt that such a facility was necessary after a South African air ambulance was summoned to transport the “ailing” president for more acute care in Johannesburg when he was, in fact, already dead. Some believed that this had been an attempt to conceal his death and manipulate the presidential succession process.
The new health programmes will also include the establishment of a new cancer treatment centre at Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) in Lilongwe. This will save costs by reducing the number of patients who have to be sent abroad for treatment by at least 50%.
 

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Latest News

AAD2018: Air BP tech services to support African aviation growth

International aviation fuel products and services supplier, Air BP, returns to Africa Aerospace and Defence (AAD2018) at Waterkloof Air Force Base in Pretoria, South Africa, this week as a Gold Sponsor, using the event to share how its

Bryan looks West for growth

Delta Airlines is targeting the growth potential of Nigeria. Chukwu Emeke explains why.

Riyadh is named as the headquarter for the Regional Safety Oversight Organisation for MENA

The General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) has announced the selection of the city of Riyadh as the headquarter for the Regional Safety Oversight Organisation for the Middle East and North Africa (RSOO – MENA).

Ethiopian maps the route to 2025

Ethiopian MRO Services is building its capabilities to meet growing demand for MRO services and to expand its third-party business operations in Africa. Kaleyesus Bekele reports from Addis Ababa.

Aviation drives economic prosperity for Mauritius

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) called on the government of Mauritius to continue to focus on aviation as a strategic enabler of the country’s economic and social development.

Boeing names interim communications leader

The Boeing Company has announced that Phil Musser, senior vice president of Communications, will depart the company in early November due to personal and family considerations. Anne Toulouse, current Boeing vice president of Global

TAA SK1009311218
See us at
AAD2018 BTMarrakechAirshow BT2507241018AviationAfrica_BT0607280219AirCargoAFA_BT220318210219