in Air Transport

IATA welcomes single African Air Transport Market but says effective implementation is key

Posted 29 January 2018 · Add Comment

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) welcomes the launch of the Single African Air Transport Market (SAATM) initiative by the African Union (AU) to open up Africa’s skies and improve intra-African air connectivity.

Enhanced connectivity will stimulate demand, improve the competitiveness of the African airline industry, and make air travel more accessible. In turn, this will enable higher volumes of trade, expanded tourism and growing commerce between African nations and with the rest of the world.

“The SAATM has the potential for remarkable transformation that will build prosperity while connecting the African continent. Every open air service arrangement has boosted traffic, lifted economies and created jobs. And we expect no less in Africa on the back of the SAATM agreement. An IATA survey suggest that if just 12 key African countries opened their markets and increased connectivity an extra 155,000 jobs and US$1.3 billion in annual GDP would be created in those countries,” said Rapahel Kuuchi, IATA’s Vice President for Africa.

“We commend the 23 States that have signed up to SAATM.  It is an important step forward. But the benefits of a connected continent will only be realised through effective implementation of SAATM—firstly by the countries already committed and also by the remaining 32 AU member nations still to come on board,” said Kuuchi.

One of the main obstacles to the implementation of previous open skies pledges - 1988 Yamoussoukro Declaration and 1999 Yamoussoukro Decision – has been the absence of an underpinning regulatory text. IATA welcomes the AU’s adoption of the regulatory text of the Yamoussoukro Decision (YD) – also the framework for SAATM - which covers competition and consumer protection and dispute settlement as these safeguard the efficient operation of the market.

“Today’s decision is momentous. SAATM is a decisive step towards greater intra-African connectivity and delivers the framework on which to achieve it. Now it’s time to get down to the work of implementation. Greater connectivity will lead to greater prosperity. Governments must act on their commitments, and allow their economies to fly high on the wings of aviation,” Kuuchi concluded.

 

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Latest News

Air Mauritius starts operations to Wuhan, China

The Wuhan route will be served by an Airbus A340 in a 34 business class and 264 economy class configuration.

ExecuJet welcomes first Pilatus PC-24 to Africa

ExecuJet, part of the Luxaviation Group, will be the first business aviation company to operate and manage a Pilatus PC-24 Super Versatile Jet in Africa.

Why Africa looks booked to succeed

For many years, Africa has been talked of as a continent of great potential in commercial aviation. That potential has never really materialised. As Alan Dron reports, the authors of a new book believe that, at last, things are about to

First ACJ320neo is assembled

The first ACJ320neo has been assembled on programme, fitted with CFM International LEAP-1A engines and painted in ACJ house-colours, in preparation for a first flight in the coming weeks.

Support our industry call from new ACI boss

Bongani Maseko, new chairman of the Airports Council International (ACI), believes that, despite challenges, African aviation is becoming a strong contributor to global economic growth.

Rwanda Civil Aviation Authority recognises IATA's Airline Safety Audit Programme

Kigali – The International Air Transport Association (IATA) and the Rwanda Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) signed an MoU to partner for the improvement of aviation safety.

TAA SK0902311218
See us at
MarrakechAirshow BT2507241018AirCargoAFA_BT220318210219AviationAfrica_BT0607280219AAD2018 BTGroundHandling BT2205130918