in Maintenance

IATA and CFM International sign pro-competitive agreement on engine maintenance

Posted 2 August 2018 · Add Comment

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has entered into an agreement with CFM International (CFM) that will lead to increased competition in the market for maintenance, repair and overhaul services (MRO) on engines manufactured by CFM, a 50/50 partnership between GE and Safran Aircraft Engines.

 

“Airlines spend a tremendous amount of money on the maintenance and repair of aircraft and engines to ensure we are always operating to the highest levels of safety and reliability. This milestone agreement with CFM will lead to increased competition among the providers of parts and services related to the servicing of CFM engines. We expect increased competition will reduce airline operating costs and help to keep flying affordable. And we hope that this agreement will be an example for other manufacturers to follow,” said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA’s Director General and CEO.

Under the agreement, CFM has adopted a set of “Conduct Policies” that will enhance the opportunities available to third-party providers of engine parts and MRO services on the CFM56 and the new LEAP series engines. Among the many elements of the agreement, CFM has agreed to:

    License its Engine Shop Manual to an MRO facility even if it uses non-CFM parts

    Permit the use of non-CFM parts or repairs by any licensee of the CFM Engine Shop Manual 

    Honor warranty coverage of the CFM components and repairs on a CFM engine even when the engine contains non-CFM parts or repairs

    Grant airlines and third-party overhaul facilities the right to use the CFM Engine Shop Manual without a fee

    Sell CFM parts and perform all parts repairs even when non-CFM parts or repairs are present in the engine

The agreement includes specific provisions ensuring the implementation of CFM’s commitments with regard to CFM56 series engines which power some 13,400 single-aisle aircraft flying today. CFM has, however, committed to apply the agreement to all commercial engines produced by the company, including engines in its new LEAP Series. GE, moreover, has agreed to apply the Conduct Policies to other commercial aircraft engines that it produces in its own right.

Beneficiaries of the agreement include IATA, CFM’s airline customers, aircraft lessors, third-party MRO facilities and parts manufacturers.

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

International players behind Libya’s drone war

Strikes are taking place every day in Libya’s deadly drone war. In the first conflict where unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are making up the bulk of the air operations, both sides have successfully attacked opposition aircraft. Alan

African airlines’ traffic climbed 1.8% in October

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) announced global passenger traffic data for October 2019 showing that demand (measured in total revenue passenger kilometers or RPKs) climbed 3.4% compared to the year-ago period.

SAA to enter into business rescue

South African Airways (SAA) has announced that the Board of Directors of SAA has adopted a resolution to place the company into business rescue at the earliest opportunity.

Just the ticket for tourism - or is it?

A new agreement among African states seeks to link the growth of air transport and tourism – but more has to be done to improve the continent’s aviation infrastructure. Alan Dron reports.

Air Senegal receives second A330neo

Air Senegal has taken delivery of its second A330neo. Anuradha Deenapanray Chappard reports.

African freight carriers see fastest growth of any region in October

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) released data for global air freight markets showing that demand, measured in freight tonne kilometers (FTKs), decreased by 3.5% in October 2019, compared to the same period in 2018.

AVMENA20 SK1309100620
See us at
AVMENA20 BT1309100620AVAFA20BT2207050320