in Air Transport

Boeing: Aircraft flying on 100% sustainable fuels by 2030

Posted 25 January 2021 · Add Comment

Boeing is setting an ambitious target to advance the long-term sustainability of commercial aviation, committing that its commercial aircraft are capable and certified to fly on 100% sustainable aviation fuels by 2030.

 

Boeing commits to aircraft flying on 100% sustainable fuels by 2030.  Image: Boeing

Boeing has previously conducted successful test flights replacing petroleum jet fuel with 100% sustainable fuels to address the urgent challenge of climate change.

 

According to the Air Transport Action Group, U.S. Department of Energy and several other scientific studies, sustainable aviation fuels reduce CO2 emissions by up to 80% over the fuel’s life cycle with the potential to reach 100% in the future. Today, sustainable aviation fuels are mixed directly with conventional jet fuel up to a 50/50 blend — the maximum allowed under current fuel specifications. In order to meet aviation’s commitment for reducing carbon emissions by 50% from 2005 levels by 2050, airplanes need the capability to fly on 100% sustainable aviation fuels well before 2050.

 

“Our industry and customers are committed to addressing climate change, and sustainable aviation fuels are the safest and most measurable solution to reduce aviation carbon emissions in the coming decades,” said Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Stan Deal. “We’re committed to working with regulators, engine companies and other key stakeholders to ensure our airplanes and eventually our industry can fly entirely on sustainable jet fuels.”

 

Boeing’s commitment is to determine what changes are required for its current and future commercial airplanes to fly on 100% sustainable fuels, and to work with regulatory authorities and across the industry to raise the blending limit for expanded use.

 

“With a long history of innovation in sustainable aviation fuels, certifying our family of airplanes to fly on 100% sustainable fuels significantly advances Boeing’s deep commitment to innovate and operate to make the world better,” Chief Sustainability Officer Chris Raymond said. “Sustainable aviation fuels are proven, used every day, and have the most immediate and greatest potential to reduce carbon emissions in the near and long term when we work together as an industry.”

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

Air Austral in the starting-blocks

Air Austral thwarted the Covid-19 crisis by adjusting to the context and constraints of air transport by leveraging its human and technical capabilities. Let us see how the Reunionese airline is paving its way to recovery with Vincent

Tunisair in turmoil

Tunisair is in crisis. Its latest CEO, appointed in January, lasted just seven weeks before she was sacked. The country’s minister of transport has admitted the airline is “in great financial difficulty”, salaries are not being paid,

Azman Air resumes flight operations

Nigeria’s Azman Air has announced it will resume flight operations from May 16, 2021.

Locust fighting force plagued by lack of cash

A huge crisis is looming in east Africa as vital funding for the aircraft operations tackling huge swarms of locusts is drying up. Oscar Nkala reports.

Collins Aerospace unveils new look for its Venue Cabin Management System

Collins Aerospace has updated its VenueTM Cabin Management System (CMS). A new and improved Venue graphical user interface (GUI) is now available for aftermarket installations of the system.

Pent-up demand will help propel Africa’s travel recovery

Africa’s travel recovery will be fuelled by substantial pent-up demand, according to the “Africa Travel Recovery, Opportunity & Risks Research Brief”, reports Tourism Economics, an Oxford Economics Company, written for Africa

WDS SK2601090322
See us at
WDS BT1202090322Aviation MENA 2022Shields AfricaDAS21_BTAviation Africa 2021 BTOC