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Aviation Safety Network reports increase in fatal air accidents

Posted 2 January 2019 · Add Comment

The Aviation Safety Network (ASN), the Dutch-based exclusive service of the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) has released its 2018 airliner accident statistics showing a total of 15 fatal airliner accidents, resulting in 556 fatalities. These include the non IATA airlines.

 The statistics are based on all worldwide fatal commercial aircraft accidents (passenger and cargo flights) involving civil aircraft carrying 14 or more passengers.
Despite several high-profile accidents, the year 2018 was one of the safest years ever for commercial aviation, the organisation said. However, last year was worse than the five-year average.
During 2018, ASN recorded 15 fatal airliner accidents resulting in 556 fatalities. This makes 2018 the third safest year ever by the number of fatal accidents and the ninth safest in terms of fatalities. The safest year in aviation history was 2017 with 10 accidents and 44 lives lost.
Twelve accidents involved passenger flights, three were cargo flights. Three out of 15 accident airplanes were operated by airlines on the E.U. "blacklist", up by two compared to 2017.
Given the estimated worldwide air traffic of about 37,800,000 flights, the accident rate is one fatal accident per 2,520,000 flights.
Reflecting on this accident rate, Aviation Safety Network's CEO Harro Ranter (pictured right) said that the level of safety has increased significantly: "If the accident rate had remained the same as ten years ago, there would have been 39 fatal accidents last year. At the accident rate of the year 2000, there would have been even 64 fatal accidents. This shows the enormous progress in terms of safety in the past two decades."
ASN commented that ‘loss of control’ accidents are a major safety concern as this type of accident was responsible for at least ten of the 25 worst accidents. Most of those accidents were not survivable.
The ASN figures do not include accidents involving military transport aircraft such as the 
April 11 accident involving an Algerian Air Force IL-76 transport plane that killed 257. Indeed when including this sector, the total number fatalities would be 917 in 25 fatal accidents.
 

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