in General Aviation

Air Serv begins operations in Central African Republic

Posted 7 April 2020 · Add Comment

An Air Serv aircraft is on the ground in Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR) to support humanitarian operations there.

 

The programme is expected to be short term until it can be taken over by the French organisation, Aviation Sans Frontieres (ASF). However, border closings are quickly impacting the movement of aircraft and crew from country to country, increasing the likelihood of extension.

 

The Air Serv team arrived in CAR with the expectation of remaining for the next thirty days, but is prepared to continue the program should conditions deteriorate and the ASF crew is unable to enter the country.

 

“Emergency response waits for nothing. If anything, services are needed now more than ever,” said Air Serv CEO, Stu Willcuts. “The world is facing challenges never before seen, but we are determined to continue providing support as long as we are able.”

 

The programme is operating as part of a network providing air transport services to nongovernmental agencies and humanitarian organisations working within the region. Relief organisations, and especially healthcare providers, are under extreme strain as the virus begins to spread through the country. Six confirmed cases had been reported as of March 31, although the number is not widely considered accurate due to a shortage of tests and is expected to increase quickly.

 

CAR is heavily dependent on outside assistance, with an estimated 70% of healthcare provided by nonprofit aid organisations. The inability to transport cargo and personnel into the country due to border closings could have catastrophic effects. The Norwegian Refugee Council reports that currently, only three ventilators are available to the population of nearly five million people. Air Serv is working alongside other aid organizations to source and deliver supplies amid worldwide suspension of international commercial flights, as an increasing number of countries are permitting the arrival and departure of humanitarian cargo flights only.

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

IATA warns governments on high cost of testing

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) called on governments to take action to address the high cost of COVID-19 tests in many jurisdictions and urged flexibility in permitting the use of cost-effective antigen tests as an

Gulfstream exceeds 500 in-flight connectivity service installations

Gulfstream Aerospace has surpassed 500 installations of the Inmarsat Jet ConneX in-flight connectivity platform on large- cabin aircraft. The Wi-Fi solution is available on new aircraft and can be retrofitted on qualifying existing

Embraer delivered 34 jets in Q2 of 2021

Embraer delivered a total of 34 jets in the second quarter of 2021, of which 14 were commercial aircraft and 20 were executive jets (12 light and eight large).

ICAO SG highlights African aviation's growth potential

Addressing Africa’s aviation leaders last week, most notably through her opening of the 2021 AFI Aviation Week, ICAO Secretary General Dr Fang Liu highlighted the tremendous potential future for aviation in Africa that could be

Single-engine Denali aircraft joins Beechcraft turboprop family

Textron Aviation is realigning its turboprop aircraft lineup as the single-engine Beechcraft Denali (previously branded the Cessna Denali) to join the legendary twin-engine Beechcraft King Air 260 and King Air 360/360ER as part of

Rostec starts developing hydrogen-powered aircraft engines

United Engine Corporation of Rostec has started a programme to develop hydrogen-powered engines for both aviation and ground applications.

WDS SK2601090322
See us at
Aviation MENA 2022Aviation Africa 2021 BTOCDAS21_BTWDS BT1202090322