in Features

SITA predicts a global transformation in passenger air travel

Posted 28 February 2013 · Add Comment

By 2015, the way we travel will change significantly fuelled by innovation in IT - used by airlines, airports and passengers, according to air transport communications and IT specialist, SITA.

 

In its report - Flying into the Future -  over the next three years, the industry will see a major transformation in the way passengers buy travel services and use self-service along their journey.
In addition, these journeys will take place in a fully mobile and social environment with airlines and airports intelligently using vast quantities of data to deliver real service and operational improvements.
Nigel Pickford, SITA’s director market insight, said: “Information technology has already had a major influence on air travel. And with the number of global travellers expected to double by 2030, it will continue to lead the way for the industry. Our survey analysis shows four major IT trends which will shape the entire travel experience, from how we book flights to how we interact with airlines and airports during the journey, to the kinds of services we expect.”
Based on SITA’s most recent surveys of airlines, airports and passengers worldwide, the four major trends which will shape the future of global air travel are:
1.   The way passengers buy travel will change. By 2015, both airlines and airports expect the web and the mobile phone to be the top two sales channels. Passengers are asking for a more personalized buying experience, and the industry is responding. For example, Alaska Airlines is one of several airlines with a travel app that alerts fliers to airfare deals from their hometowns and to cities where their friends live.
2. Passengers will take more control. By 2015, 90% of airlines will offer mobile check-in—up from 50% today. Passengers will use 2D boarding passes or contactless technology such as Near Field Communications (NFC) on their phones, at different stages of their journey, such as at boarding gates, fast-track security zones and to access premium passenger lounges. Japan Airline’s Touch & Go Android is one example of an app, which will allow passengers to pass through boarding gates using their NFC-enabled phones. France’s Toulouse-Blagnac Airport is piloting a similar service.
3. Customer services will become more mobile and social. By 2015, nine out of ten airlines and airports will provide flight updates using smart phone apps. The industry is also exploring apps to improve the customer experience. At Japan’s Narita Airport, roaming service employees personalize the customer experience by using iPads to provide airport, flight and hotel information to passengers. In addition, Edinburgh Airport is one of several airports with apps that help passengers plan their journeys to and from the airport, track their flights, access terminal maps and reserve parking spots before they arrive.
4. The passenger experience will improve thanks to better business intelligence. By 2015, more than 80% of airports and airlines will invest in business intelligence (BI) solutions. Most will focus on improving customer service and satisfaction, often through personalized services. For example, one European airline, Vueling, researches customers via social media in an effort to understand them better. It then integrates this information into their BI programs to improve loyalty.
 
Pickford said: “Passenger needs and preferences are changing. Today’s passengers want more control throughout their journey. They expect transformation in both the kinds of services airlines and airports offer, and the way they communicate with them. At the same time, the industry is investing in business intelligence solutions and collaborating more to increase operational efficiency and improve customer service and loyalty.”

 

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

EgyptAir on cloud nine with latest 737-800 delivery

EgyptAir has received its ninth and final Boeing 737-800NGs on a lease deal from Dubai Aerospace Enterprise (DAE) and valued at $864 million. All nine were handed over during in the course of the past year.

GECAS takes delivery of its 394th and last Next-Generation 737

Culminating a 20-year history of new orders for the type, GECAS has received its 394th and final skyline order of Boeing's Next Generation 737. Just over a month prior to Boeing delivering its first 737 MAX to GECAS in January, the lessor

Jambo makes a Dash for expansion

As low-cost carriers develop across Africa, Githae Mwaniki talks to Jambojet CEO, Willem Hondius, about the airline's operation plan in Kenya and the East African region.

Pilatus obtains PC-24 Type Certificates

Pilatus has obtained type certificates from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the US-American Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the first ever Swiss business jet.

Arik Air may resume London flights

The Federal Government of Nigeria is in talks with the UK on how Arik Air will return to the London route, reports The Afritraveller.

Airbus BizLab starts its third season Nigerian start-up among 12 selected for development

Airbus BizLab, the start-up accelerator of the global corporation Airbus is hosting twelve new start-ups from around the world including Nigeria over a six-month period at its facilities in Hamburg and Toulouse, during which they

Aviation Africa SK18418
See us at
Global Aerospace BT28218Aviation Africa BT18418