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Boeing names Hyslop chief technology officer

Posted 19 July 2016 · Add Comment

Boeing has named Greg Hyslop its chief technology officer (CTO), replacing John Tracy.

In March, Hyslop, 57, was named senior vice president, engineering, test & technology, assuming responsibility for the development and implementation of the company’s enterprise technology investment strategy, as well as Boeing’s research and technology, test and evaluation, and companywide engineering functions. He will continue in that role, reporting to Boeing chairman, President and CEO Dennis Muilenburg and serving on the company’s Executive Council, while taking on the CTO duties. The appointment is effective immediately.

“With a unique combination of advanced technology leadership and business acumen sharpened through many years as a program manager, Greg has the right skills and experiences to help ensure Boeing remains a world-class technology company in its second century,” Muilenburg said. “Greg recognizes the most effective technological leaps are those that exceed customers’ expectations for performance and innovation at a price they can afford.”

Prior to his current assignment, Hyslop served as vice president and general manager of Boeing Research & Technology, the company’s research and development organisation. From 2009 to 2013, he served as vice president and general manager of Boeing Strategic Missile & Defense Systems.

Hyslop joined Boeing in 1982 as a guidance and control systems engineer on missile programs. A member of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council, Hyslop holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and a master’s degree in mathematics, from the University of Nebraska, and a doctor of science degree in systems science and mathematics from Washington University in St. Louis.

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