in Air Transport

AFRAA: Safety, Connectivity, Blocked Funds, ATM & Human Capital Top Agenda for Africa

Posted 14 November 2017 · Add Comment

IATA highlighted five priorities which must be addressed for aviation to deliver maximum economic and social benefits in Africa.

These are: Enhancing safety efforts, Enabling airlines to improve intra-Africa connectivity, Unblocking airline funds, Avoiding air traffic management re-fragmentation and over-investment and Ensuring that Africa has the professionals it needs to support the industry’s growth.

Aviation currently supports 6.8 million jobs and contributes $72.5 billion in GDP to Africa. Over the next 20 years passenger demand is set to expand by an average of 5.7% annually. 
"Africa is the region with greatest aviation potential. Over a billion people are spread across this vast continent. Aviation is uniquely placed to link Africa’s economic opportunities internally and beyond. And in doing so, aviation spreads prosperity and changes peoples’ lives for the better. That’s important for Africa. Aviation can help in achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, including the eradication of poverty and improving both healthcare and education," said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA’s Director General and CEO, in a keynote address delivered on his behalf by Raphael Kuuchi, IATA Vice President, Africa, to the 49th African Airline’s Association Annual (AFRAA) General Assembly in Kigali, Rwanda. 
"Africa also faces great challenges and many airlines struggle to break-even. And, as a whole, the African aviation industry will lose $1.50 for each passenger it carries. Governments should be aware that Africa is a high-cost place for aviation. Taxes, fuel and infrastructure charges are higher than the global average. Additionally, insufficient safety oversight, failure to follow global standards, and restrictive air service agreements all add to the burden that stands in the way of aviation’s economic and social benefits," said de Juniac.
Safety in Africa has improved. In 2016 there were no passenger fatalities or jet hull losses in Sub-Saharan Africa. When turbo-prop operations are included, Sub-Saharan Africa recorded 2.3 accidents per million flights against a global average of 1.6 accidents per million flights.
Intra-Africa Connectivity 
IATA urged the 22 states that have signed-up for the Yamoussoukro Decision (which opens intra-Africa aviation markets) to follow through on their commitment. And it further urged governments to progress the African Union’s Single Africa Air Transport Market initiative.
Blocked Funds 
Airlines experience varying degrees of difficulty repatriating revenues earned in Africa from their operations in Angola, Algeria, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Libya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Sudan and Zimbabwe. "Practical solutions are needed so that airlines can reliably repatriate their revenues. It’s a condition for doing business and providing connectivity," said de Juniac.
Air Traffic Management 
IATA called on African governments to avoid air traffic management re-fragmentation in the face of decisions by Rwanda to leave the Dar-Es-Salamm Flight Information Region (FIR) and South Sudan to leave the Khartoum FIR. "ASENCA, COMESA and the EAC upper airspace initiatives improve the efficiency of air traffic management by working together. I urge Rwanda and South Sudan to reconsider their decisions," said de Juniac.
Human Capital 
Supporting that growth will need a much expanded labor force. "African Governments need to collaborate with the industry to better understand the industry’s future needs. That will guide the creation of a policy environment to support the development of future talent needed to deliver the benefits of aviation growth," said de Juniac.   
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